Apacuka: Ceramics From a Marriage

  • What’s the first thing that you created in your life that you remember to this day?

Judit: In elementary school we had a handicrafts class every two weeks. We tried all different techniques: weaving, embroidering, felting, ceramics and more. I made a bag out of tights, and a tiny doll out of textile. Mara neni, who was our teacher, has visited us with her girls many times since then at our ceramics workshop.
Gábor: LEGO. :) It’s such a creative and inspiring game. After a while, it’s not enough to follow the little instruction booklet, and then your “intuition” takes over. [Read more…]

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A peek into Apacuka’s ceramic studio

Are you intrigued by the Apacuka studio? Stay tuned for a full-length interview with the couple behind the crockery coming soon!

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Wildflower Bar in Budapest

One of my goals on the bucket list I published at the beginning of the year was to always have fresh cut flowers on the dinner table. I’m holding myself to that. Sometimes I buy a bouquet at the florist, sometimes I pick up something from the old lady sitting at the roundabout, and if I’m completely out of time, I run out and bring in a few stems from outside. Candles and flowers really dress up the table, turn the house into a home and create a good atmosphere when we sit down and eat together around them. It’s good to talk to each other this way!
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A chat with Roth Aniko, graphic designer [Design Portrait]

You can’t not know Roth Aniko. She’s always participating at the WAMP market, and not long ago she opened her own studio that you can visit at Paloma. Her works are an important part of Hungarian design, so we did an interview with her! 

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  • Did you learn this profession at school or did you start as an autodidact?

From my childhood on drawing was a constant part of my life, but I wasn’t an exceptional talent in this world. As an adolescent and then an adult, I succeeded at remaining on this ‘career’ even though I didn’t get into any applied arts schools. A lot of lucky accidents are to thank for the fact that I’m where I am today. (like the first person that bought a picture from me, who gifted me with a lot of courage. Also an acquaintance that introduced me to the secrets of silk painting, the friend of a friend that’s a printer who printed my first postcards for a kiss, and the constant support of my friends)

  • Where do you take inspiration from?

I’m inspired by anywhere and anything really. The streets of Budapest were very inspiring to me for a while. Most recently I was watching a music video and two pictures appeared to me, after which I couldn’t wait to paint them.

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  • How do you plan, create?

Right now my work is manifold, from planning to drawing the graphics, I figure what object the graphic will appear on, I choose the materials, I find the master, studio and press that creates at a high quality. I’ll say this much, it’s really hard to maintain high quality in Hungary for individual objects, this is probably the hardest part of my job and requires constant attention.

  • What is your favorite tool?

I love my paints, and my brushes, but maybe my paints a little more, I love their smell (even though aquarel doesn’t even have a scent, unless you lean really close), their forms as the water creates little craters in them, and all those colors in a box next to each other…it’s simply good to look at them, to smooth your hand along the mini little holders. I have many paint kits that I work with, but my go-to is my 24 colored russian aquaria set.

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  • What is your favorite part of the creative process? Tell us about it!

I think painting is the best, when I already have the picture in my head, and all I have to do is sit down and paint. Until I got here though often weeks or months went by with gathering materials off of the internet (for example I’ve never been to London, just looked at photos), or I just look for good ideas, shapes, characters, scenes, anything to get the process started.

  • What is your favorite creation?  Have you ever created anything that you loved so much you kept it?

The trolley bus in front of the synagogue is a big favorite, it hangs on the wall in our anteroom, and moved with me from Ferencvaros all the way to our current home in Obuda. It’s an important picture for me both personally and professionally, and probably the best picture I’ve ever painted. Besides this there are a few paintings I kept, for example Honapok (Months) and parts of the Erdőlakók (Forest Dwellers) series, but my true love up until now was the trolley bus.

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  • Do you have a favorite story about the studio life of one of your works?

There are so many, but of course none of them come to mind right now…My customers help a lot when they tell me about their own needs or experiences with a given product. Every object in this regard changes a bit, I always try to shape them a bit, so that they become even more perfect for the customers’ needs, or to be more beautiful somehow, so that it will be even better to hold them.

  • What do you besides create?

Right now I’m sitting here thinking about what I should write, and not just write about things that were part of my life a long time ago (those that I wrote down but already erased), but that are a part of my life now. I realized – for the thousandth time -, that my word is my hobby, I spend a lot of time with it (=I work a lot), because that’s simply what excites me, and what I love doing. Besides this I spend time for my family and my friends, without whom none of this would have ever come to life :).

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Papr!kum: Hungarian Design That Shakes Things Up! [Designer Portrait]

Peter Toronyi’s revolutionary spice cocktail mixer is visually stunning, and gastronomically quite exciting…It gives its wielders unprecedented control over the most important ingredient in any dish: the seasoning. But the story of the piece, and its designer, doesn’t stop there. Peter provided us with lovely insight that details the harmony of his designs and design process, and the unity of the pieces of his own story. Hungary’s hottest spice benefits from the unity of classic Hungarian design and everyday inspiration in this portrait — reading it will surely spice up your own day! [Read more…]

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